Draft vs. Volunteer Army...

Defense Department Celebrates 35 Years of All-Volunteer Force By Army Staff Sgt. Michael J. Carden American Forces Press Service WASHINGTON, June 25, 2008 – On July 1, the nation will mark 35 years of an armed military made up solely of volunteers. Until July 1973, the military operated under an involuntary draft policy to produce manpower to fight the country’s wars. Draftees served during both world wars, the Korean War and the Vietnam War. Opposition to the war in Vietnam brought extreme scrutiny to the draft, and the public’s increasing dissatisfaction took its toll during President Richard Nixon’s administration. Congress eventually approved the institution of the all-volunteer force, and although the framework for selective service remained in place, the armed forces stopped drafting people to serve. For the past 35 years, volunteers manned 100 percent of the armed forces during the nation’s times of need, including the Cold War as well as conflicts in Bosnia and Kosovo. They filled the ranks and fought in the Persian Gulf, Panama and Grenada. Retention flourishes among the services – in both the active duty and reserve components – as they continue to operate in Iraq and Afghanistan and conduct humanitarian missions at home and throughout the world, a senior Defense Department official said. Bill Carr, deputy undersecretary of defense for military personnel and policy, said the nation and its armed forces are stronger in many ways, thanks most notably to the aptitude and experience today’s volunteers bring to the table. Carr said about 20 percent of servicemembers in the draft era were in the bottom third of the aptitude-test scoring range. Today, only 2 percent of the force is in the bottom third, and more than 66 percent are in the top half. “One thing that characterizes...

What You have to KNOW before you VOTE!...

  To be an informed voter, Fox contributor Ben Carson thinks you should read his new voter education guide. Just yesterday, Carson — apparently also a likely presidential candidate — hyped his new voting guide e-book in a National Review Online article. According to Carson, the country suffers from a dearth of informed voters and his e-book is the solution, providing information on politicians and policies to “make it easier for people to think for themselves, rather than being herded and manipulated by those in various political organizations who hunger for power, not liberty and fairness.” Just last month, Fox & Friends co-host Elisabeth Hasselbeck suggested it may be beneficial for Americans to pass citizenship tests before gaining the right to vote. Debating the advantages of requiring high schoolers to pass civics tests before graduating and becoming eligible to vote, Hasselbeck posited that such steps could make “a more meaningful measure when you vote, perhaps, too.” She later asked viewers for their thoughts on the tests: “Civics test required to vote or graduate? Let us...